Musing of a home baker - A few days ago, mum decided that she wanted to make a traditional kuih. She hasn’t made this in ages so was quite surprised when she decided to do it. I left her to it and went about with my day. This particular kuih required a lot of kneading and folding and then stuffing. Something which I am not particularly fond of as I have no patience for it. But this time, I decided I will help.

A few days ago, mum decided that she wanted to make a traditional kuih. She hasn’t made this in ages so was quite surprised when she decided to do it. I left her to it and went about with my day.  This particular kuih required a lot of kneading and folding and then stuffing. Something which I am not particularly fond of as I have no patience for it. But this time, I decided I will help. By then, she had already made about 15 pieces. Each one slightly different from the other. So I commented on it. She told me to take one of the kuih and shove it where the sun doesn’t shine. Yes, my mum said that. It's a wonder where I get my sarcasm from.  I sat down and started working my own dough, showing her how to get it uniformly sized, not realizing that by doing it that way, the filling for the kuih would be quite minimal. Mum's response? "Don’t forget who taught you how to beat sugar and eggs". She was right. I somehow thought that I had already gained enough knowledge and experience in the kitchen to actually teach my mum a thing or two. And leave it to mum to cut me down to size. She didn’t even say much, just a smirk and maybe a zinger or two. Haha.  No matter how old you are, you never stop learning from your mum. It's like the entire universe works with them to teach you a lesson in life.  Some of you may be wondering what kuih were we working on. It's called Pang Susi.  Look it up  - clicksforcakes.com

A few days ago, mum decided that she wanted to make a traditional kuih. She hasn’t made this in ages so was quite surprised when she decided to do it. I left her to it and went about with my day.

This particular kuih required a lot of kneading and folding and then stuffing. Something which I am not particularly fond of as I have no patience for it. But this time, I decided I will help. By then, she had already made about 15 pieces. Each one slightly different from the other. So I commented on it. She told me to take one of the kuih and shove it where the sun doesn’t shine. Yes, my mum said that. It’s a wonder where I get my sarcasm from.

I sat down and started working my own dough, showing her how to get it uniformly sized, not realising that by doing it that way, the filling for the kuih would be quite minimal. Mum’s response? “Don’t forget who taught you how to beat sugar and eggs”. She was right. I somehow thought that I had already gained enough knowledge and experience in the kitchen to actually teach my mum a thing or two. And leave it to mum to cut me down to size. She didn’t even say much, just a smirk and maybe a zinger or two. Haha.

No matter how old you are, you never stop learning from your mum. It’s like the entire universe works with them to teach you a lesson in life.

Some of you may be wondering what kuih were we working on. It’s called Pang Susi.

Look it up 🙂

 


Author: Brown Sugar

A kindred baking soul looking for the meaning of life in mountains of cookies and cakes and pools of chocolate ganache. Brown Sugar's favourite saying? "A cake a day keeps the doctor away".

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